A southern English forest in sounds and pictures

A nettle grows out of the centre of a moss-covered, truncated tree trunk in Micheldever Wood.
A nettle grows out of the centre of a moss-covered, truncated tree trunk in Micheldever Wood.
Jay Richardson

Jay Richardson

8 August 2022

Trees and forests have aroused strong feelings in Britain for centuries: their trace is scattered through its literary, political, and economic history. Micheldever Wood, pictured here, is no different. The events of Shakespeare’s Macbeth, for example, turn on Birnam Wood in modern-day Perthshire.

As I did stand my watch upon the hill,
I look’d toward Birnam, and anon, methought,
The wood began to move.

Wood production and trade played particularly decisive parts in the wars that Britain fought with its European neighbours in the 16th, 17th, 18th, and early 19th centuries, and in the invasions and atrocities on which so many European countries built their empires. More prosaically, as we wrote in our piece on forest cover in April, tree-planting is now widely recognised as a very effective tool of climate adaptation, climate mitigation, and street beautification by everyone from the Committee on Climate Change to the Conservative Party.

For all the stories and statistics, though, woods can become distant from everyday life. Micheldever Wood is a mixed broadleaf-conifer woodland in Hampshire that contains many of the signature characteristics of a British forest.

Wind rustles through tall trees; a dog goes panting by; the nearby M3 motorway roars in the background. Apart from the occasional pure-toned high-pitched bird call, all is still.

A large drooping cedar drapes its needle-like leaves in a mixture of blue and green shades. Through a gap in the foliage you can see the straight slender trunk.
A large drooping cedar drapes its needle-like leaves in a mixture of blue and green shades. Through a gap in the foliage you can see the straight slender trunk.
Micheldever Wood shows its planning in long straight rows of beech.
Micheldever Wood shows its planning in long straight rows of beech.
An intricately patterned blanket of moss grows up the side and along the top of an old tree trunk.
An intricately patterned blanket of moss grows up the side and along the top of an old tree trunk.
Clearings for the paths that intersect the wood give just enough space for sunlight to reach the forest floor.
Clearings for the paths that intersect the wood give just enough space for sunlight to reach the forest floor.

Related

subscribe

to very occasional emails about new stories

* indicates required

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *